National Civil Right Museum | Memphis TN

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Tracing  the Civil Rights Movement from the 17th century to the present,  the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel  is a privately owned complex of museums and historic buildings built around the former Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Major components of the complex on 4.14 acres include a museum and the Lorraine Motel and hotel buildings. The complex also includes the Young and Morrow Building , which was the site where James Earl Ray initially confessed (and later recanted) to shooting King.

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The Lorraine Hotel (originally named the Windsor Hotel)) was built in 1925. During segregation it was an upscale accommodation that catered to a black clientele, one of only a few hotels to which African American travelers could enjoy overnight accommodations while traveling during this segregated period leading up to the late 1960s in America. Its guests included songwriters and musicians that worked nearby at to Stax Records,  including Ray Charles, Lionel Hampton, Aretha Franklin, Ethel Waters, Otis Redding, The Staple Singers and Wilson Pickett.

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. stayed at the Lorraine Motel numerous times.  He was a guest of the Lorraine when he came to Memphis in 1968 in support of striking sanitation workers. Following the assassination King, the hotel’s then current owner, Walter Bailey, left Room 306 (the room King was assassinated in front of) and the adjoining room 307 unoccupied as a memorial to King.

The museum just recently completed a multi-million dollar renovation and expansion. See here for additional details.

Photo Credits: National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Hotel,  DavGreg (top), Stuart Seeger (middle)

CONTACT INFORMATION

National Civil Right Museum & Lorraine Motel
405 Mulberry Street, Memphis, TN 38103 USA
Phone: 901-521-9699
Website: www.civilrightsmuseum.org

MAP & DRIVING DIRECTIONS

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM ON FACEBOOK

National Civil Rights Museum
National Civil Rights MuseumMay 22nd, 2015 at 7:02pm
What do you know about Malcolm X? Learn more from Malcolm X scholar Zaheer Ali at 2-4pm Saturday, May 23, at the NCRM. Ali is a Harvard graduate finishing his Ph.D. in history at Columbia University who has taught courses on Islam and Black America, Malcolm X, Black intellectual history, Black political leadership, jazz and politics. He is also the Oral Historian at Brooklyn Historical Society. He will answer questions on the life and legacy of Malcolm X after the film about his assassination. http://www.zaheerali.com/.
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National Civil Rights Museum
National Civil Rights MuseumMay 22nd, 2015 at 5:02pm
Make a statement without saying a word. Share the power of the Civil Rights Movement with our online Gift Shop products. Stand up for voting rights. Stand against racism. Visit our online Gift Shop today and let your voice be heard through our apparel and gifts. Click the SHOP tab under our Facebook cover. Shop today!
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National Civil Rights Museum
National Civil Rights Museum with Fern Harry and Tony WigginsMay 22nd, 2015 at 4:03pm
The National Civil Rights Museum at the LORRAINE MOTEL is a story of a people, of hopes and dreams, of challenge and change. Vote for the National Civil Rights Museum at the LORRAINE MOTEL as one of USA Today's 10 Best Historic Southern Attraction. Vote once a day through Mon., May 25, at http://www.10best.com/awards/travel/best-historic-southern-attraction/
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National Civil Rights Museum
National Civil Rights MuseumMay 22nd, 2015 at 2:03pm
“We declare our right on this earth, to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society , on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring in existence…BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY,” said civil rights leader Malcolm X. Join the Museum in celebrating his life on Saturday, May 23, at 2-4pm. Malcolm X’s “by any means necessary” approach to community control and social justice influenced the Black Power Movement of the late 1960's, remnants of which are evident today in reactions to contemporary issues and in grassroots tactics.
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National Civil Rights Museum
National Civil Rights Museum with Wesley Phillip and 2 othersMay 21st, 2015 at 8:05pm
"You can't separate peace from freedom because no one can be at peace unless he has his freedom." – Malcolm X, speech, “Prospects for Freedom,” January 1965.

Learn about the life of Malcolm X Saturday, May 23, at 2-4pm at the museum.
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