New Orleans African American Museum | New Orleans, LA

new-orleans-african-american-museum.jpg
Photo by Infrogmation

The New Orleans African American Museum (NOAAM) is located in New Orlean’s historic Tremé neighborhood, the oldest surviving black community in the United States. NOAAM seeks to educate, preserve, interpret and promote the contributions that people of African descent have made to the development of New Orleans and Louisiana culture, as slaves and as free people of color[1] throughout slavery, and during emancipation, Reconstruction and contemporary times.

The NOAAM property encompasses seven historical structures located on the site of a former plantation. Permanent and temporary exhibits spotlight contemporary artists in the main house and in the former slave cottages.

One of the museum’s centerpieces is the “Louisiana-Congo: the Bertrand Donation,” a collection of African beadwork, costumes, masks, textiles and musical instruments. The 70-piece assortment of original African artwork is from the Democratic Republic of Congo. It illuminates the parallels between everyday life in the Congo and Louisiana folk culture. Other exhibits change regularly and highlight works of traditional African art to black influences and culture in modern life in New Orleans.

CONTACT INFORMATION

New Orleans African American Museum
1418 Gov. Nicholls Street, New Orleans, LA 70116 USA
Phone: (504) 566-1136
Website: www.noaam.org

MAP & DRIVING DIRECTIONS

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM ON FACEBOOK

New Orleans African American Museum of Art, Culture and History
#ThrowbackThursday Members of Mandingo Warriors Mardi Gras Indians greet another Mardi Gras Indian gang in the historic African-American Treme Community Photo: Zada Johnson
60 3 28   View on Facebook
New Orleans African American Museum of Art, Culture and History
Historic Treme Neighborhood Association.
http://www.hfta.org/
3 28   View on Facebook
New Orleans African American Museum of Art, Culture and History
#FlashbackFriday. Mother Henriette Delille from Treme, a New Orleans-born free woman of color who in 1847 founded the religious order that became known as the Sisters of the Holy Family. Born in 1812, she is widely recognized for her work serving the city's poor, especially slaves, before the Civil War. She founded a nursing home for the poor in 1841 and operated it on St. Bernard Avenue. She died in 1862. Photo courtesy: Archives of the Sisters of Sister of the Holy Family.
15 2 11   View on Facebook
New Orleans African American Museum of Art, Culture and History
#FlashbackFriday
St. Augustine Church, built by free black people with slave labour in 1841, was the first place of worship where slaves, free people of color and whites sat side by side in prayer. It is a highly significant symbol for the African-American community in America. Photo Courtesy of footage from Peter Entell's Shake Off the Devil.
18 12   View on Facebook
New Orleans African American Museum of Art, Culture and History
1 12   View on Facebook