Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture , New York NY

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The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is one of the world’s leading research facilities devoted to the preservation of materials on the global African and African diasporan experiences. It is located in the heart of Harlem and within the 135th branch of the New York Public Library.
The Schomburg Center first won international acclaim in 1926 when the personal collection of the distinguished black scholar and bibliophile Arturo Alfonso Schomburg was added to the Division of Negro Literature, History and Prints of the 135th Street Branch of The New York Public Library. Schomburg subsequently served as curator of the division from 1932 until his death in 1938. The division was renamed in his honor in 1940, and in 1972 it was designated as one of the Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

Today, the Schomburg Center contains over 10,000,000 items and provides services and programs for constituents from the United States and abroad. The Center’s collections include art objects, audio and video tapes, books, manuscripts, motion picture films, newspapers, periodicals, photographs, prints, recorded music discs and sheet music.  Highlights include:

  • One of the nation’s most comprehensive collections of paintings, sculptures, works on paper and textiles, and material culture from Africa and the African Diaspora. Featured artists include Aaron Douglas, Edward Mitchell Bannister, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller, Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence, and Romare Bearden.
  • A extensive collection of photographs from the mid-18th century to the present day, including portraits of many prominent 19th- and 20th-century black artists, political figures, actors, musicians, athletes, and social activists. Among the photographers represented are James VanDerZee, Gordon Parks, Edward Steichen, Coreen Simpson, Bert Andrews, and Chester Higgins.
  • Books and manuscripts it contains more than 3,900 rare books, 580 manuscript collections, and 15,ooo pieces of sheet music and rare printed materials. These include the original manuscript of Richard Wright’s Native Son;

CONTACT INFORMATION

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard, New York, NY 10037
Phone: 212/491-2200
Website: www.nypl.org/locations/schomburg

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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a research unit of The New York Public Library, is generally recognized as one of the leading institutions of its kind in the world. A cultural center as well as a repository, this Harlem-based modern research library also sponsors a wide array of interpretive programs, including exhibitions, scholarly and public forums, and cultural performances. For over 80 years, the Schomburg Center has collected, preserved, and provided access to materials documenting black life, and promoted the study and interpretation of black history and culture. For more information, please visit www.schomburgcenter.org
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
American Policing: The War on Black Bodies

Tuesday, September 9 at 6:30 p.m.
American Policing: The War on Black Bodies
Join the Schomburg Center for a town hall meeting on the aggressive policing of black bodies in America. The event will offer a forum to discuss police brutality, racial discrimination, stop and frisk policies, and the responses of media and local communities regarding Michael Brown, Eric Garner and others in recent news.

For more information and to register go to: http://bit.ly/1tDObyK
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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
Ethel Waters, Hall of Fame singer and actress, died on this date, September 1, 1977. Some of her most well known recordings were “Stormy Weather,” “Taking a Chance on Love,” “Am I Blue?,” and her rendition of “His Eye Is on the Sparrow.” Waters was the first African American woman to be nominated for an Emmy Award and the second to be nominated for an Academy Award.

Image: NYPL Digital Collections http://bit.ly/1BuDguC
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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
On August 30, 1983, Dr. Guion Stewart “Guy” Bluford, Jr. became the first African American in space. Bluford, pictured, had earned his M.S. and PhD in aerospace engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology. He flew the space shuttle, performed various experiments and aided in the launch of a $45 million weather and communications satellite for India. During this first mission with more to come, launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Bluford received a call from Ronald Reagan in which he said, “You will serve as a role model for so many others and be so inspirational.”

#todayinblackhistory
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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
First Friday: Labor Day Edition
Friday, September 5 at 6:00 p.m.

Join us on Friday September 5, 2014 for First Friday: Labor Day “West Indian Day Edition.” Calling all West Indians & others to come enjoy the celebration! FEEL FREE TO REP YOUR COUNTRY WITH YOUR PARAPHERNALIA AND FLAGS! The Schomburg Center has played a pivotal role within Caribbean communities and thrives off of the support of all groups within our community. We will be showing the Video “Carnival TNT," a colorful and lively film which celebrates the Carnival festivities in Trinidad and Tobago in the American Negro Theater.

For more information and to register go to: http://bit.ly/1zG3p6a
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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
Conversations in Black Freedom Studies - The Urban Crisis: An Unfinished Agenda

Thursday, September 4 at 6:00 p.m.
Conversations in Black Freedom Studies

As we kick off our Conversations in Black Freedom Studies Series, join us for The Urban Crisis: An Unfinished Agenda with Dr. Robert Curvin, Junius Williams, and Dr. Clarence Taylor, Baruch College.

"The time is ripe to revisit the unfinished agenda of the Black Revolt against the urban crisis: What is to be done? The Stop Killer Cops Campaign has a rich yet neglected history from the shooting of black children in Brooklyn in the 1970s to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson in 2014.

This roundtable of experts will unpack the congested issues of the urban crisis and suggest some current alternatives. Clarence Taylor is a pioneering expert on Civil Rights in the Jim Crow North, writing a book on the history of police brutality in NYC. Junius Williams is a veteran of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee or SNCC and the Students for a Democratic Society or SDS, who pioneered advocacy planning and community development. Mr. Williams will discuss his memoir, Unfinished Agenda: Urban Politics in the Era of Black Power. And, Robert Curvin is a veteran of the Congress of Racial Equality or CORE in Essex County, New Jersey, former dean at the New School & past member of the New York Times editorial board, who has stayed on the cutting edge of alternative community development and economic empowerment from his work at the Ford Foundation to his teaching at Rutgers University. Mr. Curvin will discuss his new book, with an overview of those issues in Inside Newark: Decline, Rebellion, and the Search for Transformation." —Komozi Woodard

For more information and registration go to: http://bit.ly/XTaVz3
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