Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture , New York NY

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The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is one of the world’s leading research facilities devoted to the preservation of materials on the global African and African diasporan experiences. It is located in the heart of Harlem and within the 135th branch of the New York Public Library.
The Schomburg Center first won international acclaim in 1926 when the personal collection of the distinguished black scholar and bibliophile Arturo Alfonso Schomburg was added to the Division of Negro Literature, History and Prints of the 135th Street Branch of The New York Public Library. Schomburg subsequently served as curator of the division from 1932 until his death in 1938. The division was renamed in his honor in 1940, and in 1972 it was designated as one of the Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

Today, the Schomburg Center contains over 10,000,000 items and provides services and programs for constituents from the United States and abroad. The Center’s collections include art objects, audio and video tapes, books, manuscripts, motion picture films, newspapers, periodicals, photographs, prints, recorded music discs and sheet music.  Highlights include:

  • One of the nation’s most comprehensive collections of paintings, sculptures, works on paper and textiles, and material culture from Africa and the African Diaspora. Featured artists include Aaron Douglas, Edward Mitchell Bannister, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller, Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence, and Romare Bearden.
  • A extensive collection of photographs from the mid-18th century to the present day, including portraits of many prominent 19th- and 20th-century black artists, political figures, actors, musicians, athletes, and social activists. Among the photographers represented are James VanDerZee, Gordon Parks, Edward Steichen, Coreen Simpson, Bert Andrews, and Chester Higgins.
  • Books and manuscripts it contains more than 3,900 rare books, 580 manuscript collections, and 15,ooo pieces of sheet music and rare printed materials. These include the original manuscript of Richard Wright’s Native Son;

CONTACT INFORMATION

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard, New York, NY 10037
Phone: 212/491-2200
Website: www.nypl.org/locations/schomburg

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THE SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE ON FACEBOOK

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a research unit of The New York Public Library, is generally recognized as one of the leading institutions of its kind in the world. A cultural center as well as a repository, this Harlem-based modern research library also sponsors a wide array of interpretive programs, including exhibitions, scholarly and public forums, and cultural performances. For over 80 years, the Schomburg Center has collected, preserved, and provided access to materials documenting black life, and promoted the study and interpretation of black history and culture. For more information, please visit www.schomburgcenter.org
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn
September 20 to October 12
Weeksville Heritage Center [158 Buffalo Avenue & Bergen Street]

Creative Time and Weeksville Heritage Center present “Funk, God, Jazz, and Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn,” a walkable month-long art exhibition of four community-based art commissions by Xenobia Bailey, Simone Leigh, Otabenga Jones & Associates, and Bradford Young. The Schomburg Center helped to organize several "Conversations on Self-Determination" as part of this project.

For more information about this exhibition and the Schomburg's conversation series: http://bit.ly/1wwBci3
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn — September 20 to October 12
Creative Time and Weeksville Heritage Center present “Funk, God, Jazz, and Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn,” a walkable month-long art exhibition of four community-based…
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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library shared Schomburg Education's photo.September 19th, 2014 at 9:41pm
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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
Conversations in Black Freedom Studies:
Education for Liberation and Freedom Schooling with Charles Payne, Brian Purnell, Ujju Aggarwal, and Nicle Burrowes.
October 2, 2014, 6 p.m.

Schomburg Education presents this dynamic adult education series with a full line up of provocative scholars and community members committed to engaging dialogue about black freedom studies. The Fall 2014 semester is curated by professors Jeanne Theoharis (Brooklyn College/CUNY) and Komozi Woodard (Sarah Lawrence College).

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/YYVZjF
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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
THROUGH A LENS DARKLY: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People
Held Over Through Tuesday, September 23
Location: Film Forum [209 West Houston St., New York, NY.]
For more information: http://bit.ly/1rekvbu

THROUGH A LENS DARKLY is inspired by the book Reflections in Black by Deborah Willis, co-producer of the film and former curator of Photographs and Prints at the Schomburg Center. THROUGH A LENS DARKLY "casts a broad net that begins with filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris’s family album. It considers the difference between black photographers who use the camera to define themselves, their people, and their culture and some white photographers who, historically, have demeaned African-Americans through racist imagery. The film embraces both historical material (African-Americans who were slaves, who fought in the Civil War, were victims of lynchings, or were pivotal in the Civil Rights Movement) and contemporary images made by such luminaries as Roy DeCarava, Gordon Parks, and Carrie Mae Weems. The film is a cornucopia of Americana that reveals deeply disturbing truths about the history of race relations while expressing joyous, life-affirming sentiments about the ability of artists and amateurs alike to assert their identity through the photographic lens."
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
THROUGH A LENS DARKLY: BLACK PHOTOGRAPHERS AND THE EMERGENCE OF A PEOPLE - Official Trailer
Now on Educational DVD! Visit www.firstrunfeatures.com/throughalensdarkly_educational.html Available for Community and Campus Screenings! Please contact stsa...
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Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
On this date, September 18, 1980, Arnaldo Tamayo Méndez became the first Cuban citizen, first Latin American and first person of African ancestry to travel in space.

Tamayo Méndez was born in Guantánamo, Cuba on January 29, 1942. He graduated from the Air Force Academy and then became a pilot in the Cuban air force. He then became a lieutenant colonel and was chosen to be a part of the Soviet Union’s Intercosmos program. Tamayo Méndez went into space as a crew member of Soyuz 38. In space, Tamayo Méndez and fellow cosmonaut Yuri Romanenko conducted many experiments. Some of their experiments included trying to find the cause for space adaptation syndrome and research on the crystallization of sucrose in microgravity with Cuban sugar. When Tamayo Méndez returned, he was presented with several awards such as the Hero of the Republic of Cuba medal.

#todayinblackhistory
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